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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
. seeing the world in fast forward. seeing mountains of antarctica and south america and america, history of what of the great pyramids and finishing in the opera house. it was a fantastic journey. i loved it. jenna: wow, you squeezed it all in during a vacation. you have a personal mission about health and getting people fiscally active. they don't have to run marathons but what would you like people to do. >> i work for the scottish government. this is single best thing you can do for your health. 9% of the world's population died to lack of exercise. do 30 minutes walking five days a week or any form of exercise that is 0% off an early death. i'm from scotland so i like a bargain. jenna: how is it possible? how did you eat and sleep and jump on these planes? how did you do this? >> there was a lot of careful planning along with a fair bit of actual physical --. but the most difficult part was not the running, it was logistics. getting out of antarctica, making sure flights went and enough food to feed a 600 kilogram crocodile and getting sleep along the way. i managed to get it done an
but starting today anyone with a phone in key emerging markets in india and south america and australia can sign up and it will roll out worldwide including here in the u.s. becky? >> julia, thank you very much. we'll be watching all that as it comes out later today. >>> let's talk consequences of the fiscal cliff. companies of announces dividends in recent days trying to avoid the tax hikes set to kick in at the end of the year. who is really making money on this? >> a lot of people especially ceos more than 110 companies have announced special dividends in the fourth quarter alone that's more than three times last year's fourth quarter. the reason? the fiscal cliff. if we go off the cliff tax rates on dividends could go from 15% to more than 43%. companies are racing to beat the tax hikes by paying dividends before december 31st and some of the biggest beneficiaries, both insiders and ceos. mickey arison is getting $89 million from carnival giving him a potential tax savings. and larry elison is getting savings around $56 million. thomas frist at hca is getting around $350 million, saving
, and south america, which we really don't have now. really makes us a global powerhouse. >> you know, is the underwear business and the jeans business a bigger business than the suit business for example? >> yes. the underwear business worldwide is over a billion dollars in sales and jeans business is close to $2 billion. so those are the two largest categories followed by fragrance which is about a billion and a half dollars. >> when you did the tommy deal you knocked the cover off the ball. you put some numbers out. you delevered the company quickly. now you're back doing the warnerco deal. is this going to be as transformational? >> i think in some ways it's going to be more transformational. it really opens up two key markets for us to operate directly. today we are operating on joint ventures and licensing arrangements. so in asia, china specifically, ind india, and in latin america with brazil, you know, really opening up the developing economies, where warnaco, in those two areas approaching 20%. >> phillips-van heusen, to be able to transform it from what we think of when we
the steps that will help delta grow in the future. you look at the alliances they're forming, gold in south america, and now with virgin atlantic. they're trying to position delta to have greater access globally for their business customers. that's the key here. >> yes. oil refining, they are thinking different, biphil for sure. phil lebeau in new york. willy walsh making a bet with richard branson that the virgin airlines brand will not be around in five years. branson offered to bet 1 million pounds, walsh reportedly said, i don't have a million pounds. a knee in the groin maybe. that's as painful to him as it might be to me. why can't our executives be that creative. >> that's so colorful. >> a ceo challenging another one like that in this country? >> it would be rare. >> it's rare. usually they control the company. that is typically -- they have large shareholders, they're never going to say something like that. >> they don't often mention body parts. >> only a guy could really appreciate that story. >>> cramer's live in washington. six stocks in 60 seconds. >>> if lawmakers do not agre
? i will talk about the bricks in a minute. i am talking about south america, eastern europe, parts of asia. why do i love this story? it is basic macroeconomics. the key ingredients that drive growth. we know the story of debt, deficit, fiscal cliff. we know that the story of the aging population and financing, if you look at the statistics are round or they measure the performance in mathematics, science, and reading, you can see where the problem is. today, they were in the number 27, 28, and so on. productivity generally is the x factor that accommodates for 60% of why one country grows and another does not. generally, it includes things like political dynamic, so we know what is happening there. that is not my prediction. look at this framework, capital, labor, productivity. you will see why i am incredibly bullish. in terms of capital, these economies by a large did not have the debt burden that other countries are facing right now. why is that important? these countries are not suffering from a deal leveraging problem. 60%-70% is under the age of 25. in you got there, over 50
increase on january 1. colleagues, republicans as well as democrats, sign now, the signal that america needs. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from michigan yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from south carolina seek recognition? without objection, the gentleman from south carolina is recognized for one minute. mr. wilson: mr. speaker, yesterday speaker boehner sent a letter to the president in response to his unreasonable proposal to how congress can avert the fiscal cliff. shortly after the election, the house republican leadership presented the president with a balanced framework of coupling spending come cutlers and reforms. it also states, quote, regrettably the proposal outlined on behalf of your administration contains very little in the way of common ground. the proposal calls for a $1.6 trillion in new tax revenue, twice the amount you supported during the campaign. end of quote. house republicans understand the necessity of finding a reasonable solution. we have made it very clear, we're willing to work with the senate leadership to find middle ground legi
years out, 20 years out. he wants to keep the game robust, keep it america's pastime. and obviously, he wants to keep participation high because that will keep popularity high. >> we come from the football capital of the country, the south, where it's a ritual. but, i mean, i have friends in the south whose kids don't play. >> let me tell you, i played football from the time i was 8 years old, from 8 to 18. it was my life. we watched, you know, s.e.c. football every saturday. sunday. >> they have helmets when you played? >> yeah, they did. >>letter? >> yeah, they were leather. >> that explanation's out the door. >> watched nfl on sunday. it was our life. but i will tell you, i did not ever really want my kids to play football. it's gotten too dangerous. >> scary. >> we're going to have to reexamine what we do. >> to hear big football fans like you guys say shows that t real issue. >> not only big football fans but, you know, 6'4". i weigh way too much. i still don't know that i would -- >> 5'11". >> yeah. see, you get broken in half on the field. >> what do you run the 40 in? >> i used
the fiscal cliff is all about. it's about people. not politics. it's about protecting america's future. not repeating the mistakes of the past. with that, i'm proud to introduce my colleague, christi -- kristi noem from south dakota. >> good afternoon. thank all of you for coming. i was having a conversation with my 10-year-old son the other day, talking about lessons i had learn from my grandfather. my grandfather had always taught me that those people you are indebted to, they control you. they control your decisions, your opportunities, and what your future is going to be. right now, the amount of debt our children have sit ogen their heads that they're responsible for for the federal deficit is over $50,000 each. that's going to control them. that's going to control their futures and their decisions that they'll have available to them in the future. that's why the president's plan to raise taxes isn't a solution. because it only covered 8% of our federal deficit. it's not a solution that actually solves the problem that we have. we have got to have a solution that really addresses
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)